Archives For Training

Last week, I invited my blog friends to ask me a question about my involvement in the world of opera that I could expand into an article for my weekly blog. I have set myself the challenge to try and answer these questions in the comments or allow them to inspire me to create a full article. So here it goes!

John W. Howell asked me: “How do I keep my voice in shape for a demanding performance schedule?”

My initial answer to John’s question was: “Years and years of the best vocal training by classically trained teachers, vocal warm-ups and cooldowns, lots of water to drink, honey and lemon and specialist teas. I don’t often drink alcohol, I’ve never smoked and I rest my voice when I need to.”

I would love to take the time today to expand on my answer and provide a more detailed response, so here goes!

As an opera singer, I can’t sing all day long. I seem to have been saying this on repeat recently to potential landlords and letting agents when they ask me about my job. I promise I am not noisy 24/7 and that I am conscious of my neighbours!  I have to plan my practice and use of my voice in the rehearsal room, the amount that I can sing in a day does fluctuate but most days I actively sing for 2- 3 hours.

In order to sing operatic music, like an athlete, I need to warm up the muscles that become engaged when I am singing. I usually begin most days with a 20-30 minute warm up. This includes some gentle humming exercises, scales, and arpeggios progressing to coloratura exercises to maintain flexibility in my vocal range. This allows my voice to work at its best. However, sometimes my schedule doesn’t allow for a generous warm-up time, because of available space at the rehearsal venue or the time of the rehearsal/lesson. So, if I know in advance that I will have limited time to warm up my voice before I leave home I will try to do a simple yoga routine or gentle stretches so that my body is better prepared. I personally love using “Yoga with Adrienne” on youtube. She has had a channel for many years now and has built up a great selection of videos for beginners and regulars. In the rehearsal room, there may be occasions when you have to mark your vocal line, this can mean singing quieter, down the octave [the melody but an octave lower – closer to speaking pitch] or even speaking. The important thing is that you don’t lower your energy level or enunciation of the text as this can cause issues for your colleagues.

So what is my experience of a demanding performance schedule?

This summer I experienced a busy period working with professional companies. I performed in three Operas spreading over July, August, and September. Each brought with it its own individual challenges.

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Candide involved a regular rehearsal period over four weeks. The positive outcome for this style of schedule allowed me to create the role of Cunegonde in great detail. I had time to learn and grow with the character, experiment with different reactions to the same series of unfortunate events, and her relationships towards the other characters in the Opera. [slipping in the title of one my favourite childhood book series there written by Lemony Snicket ]. However, my commute to the rehearsal venue was long and often I would return home very late in the evening.  In order to maintain a healthy lifestyle and my vocal stamina, I would try to unwind on my commute home, listening to music or downloading a TV program on my phone for the journey, this enabled me to relax so that when I got home I could still manage to get straight off to sleep. I would always try to bring a packed lunch and a prepared dinner if I was away from home all day. I would try to eat this at a similar time each day so that my body kept up a digestive routine. I found that this resulted in me feeling less fatigue and my voice was still supple for evening rehearsals, I didn’t feel restless because I knew that I would have access to a balanced diet. I could use my rest time on my dinner break to actually relax, rather than use the limited time desperately trying to find a place to eat, which was close to the rehearsal venue, that wasn’t too expensive, and which offered healthy food.

Mansfield Park - Jonathan Dove - Waterperry Opera Festival - 17th August 2018 Director/Designer - Rebecca Meltzer Musical Director - Ashley Beauchamp Maria Bertram - Charlotte Hoather Julia Bertram - Sarah Anne Champion Aunt Norris - Andrea Tweedale Mar

After the performances of Candide were over I went straight onto working on Mansfield Park production. Thankfully before we traveled to the Minack Theatre in Cornwall, I had a week of rest, [with no rehearsals scheduled by Surrey Opera]. Knowing that once we finished the performances I would have only one week before the rehearsals begin for Mansfield Park. I decided to get a head start on learning quite a difficult score by using my week off before the Candide performances to start my preparations for Mansfield Park. I recorded the libretto with two friends, both fantastic Mezzo Sopranos, Brigette and Hannah on an app.  The app was recommended to me by my wonderful friend Frances Thorburn, who I worked with on The Little White Town Of Never Weary and who now plays Kim Monroe on River City, a very popular Scottish Soap Opera.

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Frances has to learn a huge amount of lines each day for filming, she encouraged me to try this method because you can practise the whole script by yourself. It provides you with options to listen to scenes on repeat, isolate your lines or provide timed gaps so that you can speak your lines in. This style of memorising is very useful to me as an artist as I can learn the text, without having to sing too much. This allows me to use my singing time on specific musical goals and technically tricky areas. What I didn’t expect to learn from this, was that because I broke up the learning and began it earlier, most of what I learned had settled and made the week revising it musically before rehearsals so much more relaxed. It was still stressful, and I needed to work hard to learn the whole score off copy, but I felt positive and that I could achieve it because of the groundwork I put in. This kind of positive mental attitude and a relaxed mindset allows me to stay in top physical condition. If I become too stressed I know that my body is more susceptible to picking up a virus or other illness. I now always try to plan in break times and aim to finish my work for the day no later than 9:00pm, unless a rehearsal schedule goes over this.

Mansfield Park - Jonathan Dove - Waterperry Opera Festival - 17th August 2018 Director/Designer - Rebecca Meltzer Musical Director - Ashley Beauchamp Maria Bertram - Charlotte Hoather Julia Bertram - Sarah Anne Champion Aunt Norris - Andrea Tweedale Mar

Once the performances for Mansfield Park came to a close, I was then able to move onto preparation for BambinO. The benefit of having this opera at the end of a busy run was that I knew the music and the staging inside out, although the new team had changes that I had to adjust to quickly. I had a recording from a previous performance that I would use to run through the staging and I practised my part musically at the piano. During the week I managed to squeeze in a coaching session with Christopher Middleton where we worked on my current aria package, he is so insightful and I appreciate all his help and advice. This meant that I had a little extra breathing space to begin planning my next projects as I also needed to move out of my room at Student Halls and find somewhere new to live in London. I was so grateful that I knew this opera because I found moving lodgings quite stressful.   I like to plan ahead of time, but the rental market in London moves very fast and I didn’t sign a contract for a new place until the morning before my flight to Aberdeen! Knowing that I knew the music allowed me to feel calm and in control. I hope that in the future I will be able to bear this in mind when planning work and projects.

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I have had a great summer and feel energised for the upcoming months. I have learned how to multi-task projects better and I am thankful that I have been able to maintain my vocal health and stamina. What I didn’t expect to learn from this, was that because I kept up my vocal practise, i.e. singing for 6 days a week that my recovery time after taking a long weekend off was much quicker which allowed me to perform challenging coloratura arias with the fast runs sounding smoother, in fewer practise days, allowing me to work on my personal targets sooner. Whilst touring Scotland I took the advantage of meeting up with Judith Howarth, my singing teacher from my time at the RCS.  She helped me with my bel canto phrasing and floating and after my time with her, I left feeling re-energised and motivated for the months ahead.

Prepared

This week – I’m preparing for my vocal exam next Wednesday. Asking questions of myself; how can I better this? Am I using my time effectively?

I recently found myself at an enriching crossroads, where I reached a point in my development and I was unsure where to take my music from there.

I have been singing with the conscious effort of being correct. But I cannot do this when I perform. I need to lose myself in the music that I am performing. I am singing the dots, rather creating a line and sewing the phrase together.

    “Nowadays, we tend to rely on sound rather than shape. But music is not about sound. Sound is simply its material, (as paint is for painting). What music is about is gesture, colour, shape, form and, especially, emotional intensity.” [The New York Times, Rodger Norrington. 2003].

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Pascal “paints” his pictures using his photographs in place of paints. The way he uses them makes his work individual and unique and this is what I want from my singing. But maybe not quite this wild ( He He He )

My voice is like paint, but if I don’t involve good technique of brush strokes, or make decisions myself on how I want to paint I’m only copying someone else’s interpretation and not my own.

So I turned off my iPhone, Facebook, Twitter, and e-mail. I lost myself in music such as Debussy and watched master-classes and interviews of idols. e.g.

Barbara Bonney master-classes:

     “You are supposed to like yourself. That’s the thing, you are supposed to like yourself and who you are because if you don’t how can they like you, (you know). So it’s not about saying ‘Oh I am the best in the world’. It is about saying I accept myself, I trust myself. I enjoy being me, I love having my voice. And all I can do is share that with you through the music that someone else has written. And that I have the privileged of singing for you.” – Barbara Bonney.

Practice

I need to practise every different option for every phrase: swelling, diminuendo, crescendo, attack, softly float… So when I get to perform I have more ideas to play with. It isn’t about practising and creating a structure that I must follow every time I perform. It is about preparing for every scenario so when I sing from my imagination I can spontaneously react to my emotions at that second rather than thinking.

“You have to be prepared for everything the conductor wants you to do, but on top of that you need to be ready for everything you want to do.” – Barbara Bonney.

It is me who is expressing; it is my imagination; it’s Charlotte’s version of Rusalka, Mimi, Tosca … It is my version of the story and I need to be brave enough to tell it how I feel it should be told at that specific space in time.  I can’t change the notes it’s more about adding more emotional intensity.

It always keeps it interesting; therefore you are not a copy of yourself every time you sing. Every time you sing it is completely fresh. Maria Callas said “I practise, practise, practise, I go on stage, I turn off my brain, and I let it go, I see what happens, I improvise the entire evening.”

SongsFromTheHeart

This is where I am at with my pieces, I have learnt them, I have practised them and now I need to explore every dynamic option so that when it is my time to perform I can let go and sing from the heart .